snow

Posted by Ellen

We offer a robust winter sports program here in Kater Street. See, for example.

Posted by Ellen

In 1899, snow was shoveled off busy Manhattan streets, loaded into wagons, and hauled down to the docks, where it was dumped in the river. 

Nowadays, the EPA doesn't like for states or municipalities to dump dirty snow from city streets into rivers or, as in the case of Portland, Maine, into the ocean. Portland used to throw its snow from downtown into the harbor, but it now builds mountains of snow, dump-truckload after dump-truckload, in an empty field near the airport.

New York City trucks its snow to melting machines, known as snow dragons, which can melt thirty tons of snow an hour and discharge the meltwater into the city sewer sytem. In an emergency, however, such as a ridiculously huge blizzard, we are told that the EPA will look the other way while the city rids its streets of snow the old-timey way.

Posted by Ellen

Last January, when this picture was taken, Rittenhouse Square looked plenty wintery. The snow hasn't been as deep this January, but the cold has been, if anything, even deeper. Which just goes to show, except that actually it doesn't.

Posted by Ellen

On August 13, Hank and about a dozen other climbers summited Yanaphaqcha, an 18,000-foot peak in the Cordillera Blanca range of the Peruvian Andes. As they neared the top of the mountain, they were engulfed in thick clouds spitting snow. "What you see around me in the picture," Hank says, "that was the view from the top."

Posted by Ellen

Marco's rock is right on track for the U.S. of A.

Posted by Ellen

Friday was a leapin' good snow day for dogs in Durham, North Carolina.

Posted by Ellen

"Woman on sled being pulled by biplane, with Washington Monument in the background." February 1922.

Posted by Ellen

On a day like this, all the neighborhood cats stayed indoors snoozing by the heater.

Posted by Ellen

Last night, we saw a ram with a pomegranate in Fitler Square, Philadelphia.